Significant Rainfall Event in Lake Conroe Area

The Lake Conroe watershed is currently experiencing a significant rainfall event that is resulting in both lake level rise and increased flow in local rivers and streams. As of 2:00 PM on May 11, 2015, Lake Conroe’s water level was six inches over its “full” level of 201’ above mean sea level, and additional rain is expected to fall in the watershed in the next 72 hours.

SJRA is currently releasing water from the dam in accordance with its operating procedures for the reservoir. The operating procedures for major reservoirs are created based on complex issues and take into account numerous factors such as rate and amount of precipitation, rate and amount of inflows from surrounding streams, upstream and downstream weather forecasts, projected stream flows in surrounding basins, and the safe operating range of the spillway gates. Safety is always the first concern – both the safety of the structure and the safety of residents upstream and downstream of the dam.

For anyone interested in monitoring the current conditions of the reservoir, SJRA provides continuous data regarding lake level and release rate on its homepage along with numerous other data points. In addition, historic data can be accessed by clicking the link labeled “Additional Data” (look for the map labeled San Jacinto Contrail Web). There are excellent resources on the Additional Data page that provide up-to-date information on rainfall, stream flows, lake level, and other important weather information.

At this time, we are releasing approximately 4,000 cubic feet per second. We will continue to monitor the forecast and the rate of continued lake level rise to determine if and when we might need to adjust the release rate.

Figures 1 and 2 below show information related to rainfall totals and lake level as of 2:00 PM.

For more detailed information and updates on lake levels and release information please go to www.sjra.net.

Figure 1. This map shows 24-hour rainfall totals in the San Jacinto river basin surrounding Lake Conroe as of 2:00 PM, Monday, May 11th. Areas in the drainage basin north of Lake Conroe have received up to five inches of precipitation with additional rainfall in the forecast.

Rain levels

Figure 2. This graph shows the lake level of Lake Conroe from May 5th to May 11th at 2:00 PM. Lake Conroe is considered “full” at an elevation of 201.00 feet above mean sea level.